Share this post on:

In today’s episode we’re joined by an amazing guest who is an experienced real estate professional licensed in both North Carolina (NC) and South Carolina (SC). As a guest she shared her knowledge and expertise in the real estate, art and leadership.

Veterans seeking "Financial Freedom"! Commercial Finance w/Lee Chandler Podcast

What does it mean to be financially free? While it's different for every person, a basic definition includes being able to get through financial setbacks and not worrying about ups and downs. When you rely on your next paycheck for your basic needs, it's time to think about how you can work towards being financially free. No matter what financial freedom means to you, these are the first steps you need to take to achieve security. When you go beyond meeting your basic needs from paycheck to paycheck, you will find peace of mind and financial freedom. That's not a bad exchange for a little discipline. Eric Upchurch helps us to understand "Financial Freedom for Veterans".   https://www.military.com/money/personal-finance/how-to-reach-financial-freedom.html Connect with Eric !!   Call or Text: 415-346-1842  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericupchurch/ Email: [email protected] Contact Us !! Website : https://leechandler.net/ ​Email: [email protected] Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/LeeChandlerEnt LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/lee-chandler-enterprises/ Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/leechandlerenterprises/
  1. Veterans seeking "Financial Freedom"!
  2. Doctor’s Seeking "Growth and Financial Freedom"!
  3. "When is the best time to Invest?" with David C. Jones
  4. Real Estate Investing with Logan Freeman
  5. Lending During Pandemic with Ed Ainbinder

There is no surprise that Charlotte, NC is one of the fastest real estate markets in the country. For outside investors seeking to gain a foothold in the market. It is paramount to connect with professionals and boots on the ground like Alexis.

https://anchor.fm/lee-chandler/episodes/Real-Estate-with-Alexis-Sutton-e11cqq8

High In Demand

Due to the pandemic, there has been a shortage of opportunities for those who desire to be a part of the American Dream. For many, this leads to home sold prices being higher than asking and even non-refundable due diligence money with full cash offers.

With a shortage in lumber and housing too many investors are loosing their shirt in the process. Alexis shared with that there are some homeowners that upon selling have no where to move to due to the shortage and high demand.

As an former experienced mortgage processor, Alexis special insight that gives her clients an advantage in the real estate purchasing process.

Transcript

Leland Baptist:

Hey, guys, welcome for joining the podcast. Today, we have an amazing guest speaker with you all. Her name is Alexis Sutton. How are you doing?

Alexis Sutton:

I’m doing wonderful. How are you all?

Leland Baptist:

It’s great. It’s a pleasure to have you to today and this is important for anyone who wants to have more insight on real estate and also what’s going on in today’s market and, really, what they should do going forward. So without further ado, let’s go ahead and get started. So Alexis, first and foremost, what led you to be a part of the real estate market?

Alexis Sutton:

Honestly, I do things on a whim. So I already know, because I do a lot of studying and stuff like that, the people that are rich, they got rich off of real estate. So I know who’s going to be a part of it either way, and me getting my license was just like, went down there, just sitting there like, why not? I was in Barnes & Noble. I was like, why not? And I found a class and I signed up for it. Two weeks later, I was in class. So it wasn’t a long drawn thought out process. It was a random moment.

Leland Baptist:

Wow. Did you have to go multiple times to take the test?

Alexis Sutton:

No. So here’s how it worked, here in North Carolina. So you have to take at least 90 hours. I could be wrong, 70. However, we took more than we was supposed to. But you take these classes, and you have to have those. It’s pre-req to take your exam. But with me, I went to Superior School of Real Estate. And my teacher was Bruce Moyer. He’s amazing. Everyone knows him here in this market. You had to take those classes, and you had to pass the school test.

Alexis Sutton:

Now, this was before COVID came. So you had to pass that school test. That school test was hard, so that’s where people trip up on. Well, that’s what they were tripping up on. They had to pass that school test in order to get the credits for the hours that you took. So that, I passed it on the first try. The majority of people I know did not pass on the first one. They had to repeat the class over, so I really wasn’t worried about the state and the national test. I was worried about the school test, because they did not play.

Alexis Sutton:

But when COVID came, they were doing it. So you take the hour. They couldn’t have them in there for testing, so it’s kind of like, going grad chapter pledging, I hate to say.

Leland Baptist:

They were able to do it. Wow.

Alexis Sutton:

Yeah. No, they don’t have to do it. They don’t have to take the test. So everyone’s [crosstalk 00:02:34] your license. It’s kind of like a factory, whatever, so now everyone has their license now. So that’s just me.

Leland Baptist:

Wow. So for those who don’t know, who are listening to us, you help clients, not just in the North Carolina market but also in the South Carolina market, right?

Alexis Sutton:

Yes, correct.

Leland Baptist:

What would you say is the biggest difference between the two?

Alexis Sutton:

To be honest with you, I do do most of my work in North Carolina, maybe because I’m from here. But the biggest difference, if you’re talking about the clients, there’s really nothing different with the market. I won’t go into depth in it, but to know just the gist of it, it’s just the laws and how they get paid and stuff like that. Every state is different, and if you know anything about taking a real estate test, North Carolina’s one of the hardest tests.

Alexis Sutton:

We had the most rules. South Carolina’s a little more laid-back when it comes to the rules and things of that sort. But as far as the market, it’s pretty much the same. They don’t have as many big cities as we do in North Carolina. But even though right at the border is Rock Hill and Fort Mill. That’s our sub-market of … Even though it’s in South Carolina, but a lot of people … When I was working in corporate, they were in South Carolina. They’d just drive to North Carolina.

Alexis Sutton:

And their commute may be smaller than mine, being here in Charlotte. Yeah.

Leland Baptist:

Yeah, that’s awesome. All right, so can you let us know, from your perspective, what makes a property stay on the market longer or shorter?

Alexis Sutton:

Okay, so right now, it’s the seller’s market, so ain’t too much staying on the market. And if it’s staying on the market, the main components that I know, from my experience, if a market is still on the market than what it should be, just an average home price, because the pictures aren’t great. Staging also affects the house getting sold, the marketing piece and most important, pricing.

Alexis Sutton:

You can price it at something, and right now, the market is so I got to get this property, they’ll go over the price, don’t even care if it’s worth the value or not. If it appraised at $2 and you’re selling for 5, I’m willing to pay the other $3, just to get the property, so that’s how it is. But those are the main components that keep a property on the market, but biggest thing is pricing.

Leland Baptist:

Pricing. So what’s something people wanting to purchase properties and there’s so little inventory, what could a buyer do in hopes to snatch something up before their competition?

Alexis Sutton:

First, say a prayer. I’m going to be completely honest with you. Actually, I just did a slight snippet video. I’m going to post it on my social media later, but cash is king, closing quickly, when you can’t close quickly, that that’s the great thing. And some people are even, if they can, waiving appraisal, waiving inspections, want to close really quick, if they’re not getting a loan, because if you get a loan, those are stipulations that you have to do. But people are offering $10,000 in due diligence. Some is offering $30,000 over the asking price. It’s just so many things, because it’s so aggressive out here, that it’s hard.

Alexis Sutton:

So the snippet I was just talking about, I got an email. My client wants to see a home on Saturday. And I always say, when I first tell my client, I say, “Look, it’s aggressive. And I’m aggressive. You got to get aggressive with me. I want to know how much money you got, how much you want to put down, because it’s important for me to put you in the right position to get your contract accepted.”

Alexis Sutton:

I just got one accepted, and it took us forever to get just some land, because they had so many offers. But this one property that’s on Saturday, we’re still going to go see it. However, when you go for showing time … Showing time is a thing to show everything that’s unavailable. So I tell my client, “Look for coming soons. Do not look for one’s that are new on the market, because you probably be able to see it. They probably got offers on it,” which is correct.

Alexis Sutton:

So we scheduled one to see on Saturday. I got an email last night. “We already had multiples offer on this sight, unseen. But we’re still going to do the showing, but our client is going to make a decision on Monday.” Mind you, it don’t come on the market until Saturday. “Our client’s going to make a decision on Monday, and we’re looking for the highest and best offer.” So right there, it puts your client in a frenzy. It’s puts me in an annoying state, but that’s just the way that it is.

Hank Hunt:

You were stating that some houses are going for 20, 30,000 over asking?

Alexis Sutton:

Uh-huh (affirmative).

Hank Hunt:

Typically speaking, what is the price range of a house that would garner a $30,000 over asking price? What’s the price range of these houses, typically?

Alexis Sutton:

It doesn’t matter.

Hank Hunt:

Wow.

Alexis Sutton:

I haven’t seen oh, it’s the 200s. No, I’ve seen in the 300s or things of that sort. I tell my clients, if you don’t want the stress of that, to look for new build, because it’s different. When you see a home is already there, you’re going into multiple offers. You’re going to do all this, and that’s where the stress comes at. But with new construction … And other agencies will tell you that it’s much easier … you go in there. If the lot’s available … Well, I take that back. Well, all my new constructions, the lots have been available, and then they just go ahead and get it.

Alexis Sutton:

But new builds even have waiting lists for people to get a lot that’s to even [crosstalk 00:08:39] yet.

Leland Baptist:

That’s crazy.

Hank Hunt:

You keep mentioning new build. Do you have a relationship with a developer that sort of kind of gives you some preference to try and bring to the table?

Alexis Sutton:

No. No, it’s so much out there, to be honest with you. Now me personally, even when I’m working with a different agent, I always build a repertoire with them, even if they’re kind of rah rah, I mean, because I can get there too. However, professionally, I want to have a good relationship with the other agent, so that they can better help me out to get my client in. And that’s kind of what happened with my last, when I went into contract this weekend.

Alexis Sutton:

So with the builders, I am working on some things that maybe before you even air this, I’ll be licensed, so that I do have a better relationship with builders, because that is my goal, to become one as well. That’s just me, because I know where I’m going. I know my end goal. I try to have a better relationship with builders. And sometimes, they’ll tell me … I have one person. She words with Eastwood, and she’ll be like, “Hey, well, we got this coming up. You have any clients?” It’s like, “I don’t right now, but I’ll put the word out there if they got it.”

Alexis Sutton:

So yeah, that’s pretty much what it is, but you don’t really need to have no couth with nobody. It doesn’t really benefit them, because it’s a plethora of business out there.

Hank Hunt:

You mentioned that this is a seller’s market, even with the flux of the pandemic and the anticipated increase of mortgage rates going up. Help me to understand the dynamics of the market there in North and South Carolina, with all of those extenuating circumstances or factors weighing in on the whole real estate process.

Alexis Sutton:

I want to say, we can say it’s North and South Carolina, but it’s really everywhere. You said it’s anticipation that it’s going up. It’s already down, so people want those low rates finding a house. And for sellers right now, if they want a sale, get top dollar, even more than what their home is really worth is they’ll sell it now, because they know it’s low inventory. It’s extremely low, definitely here in Charlotte.

Alexis Sutton:

So like I said, it’s a seller’s market here, period. It’s low … Pandemic didn’t stop anything. Don’t let people fool you. Pandemic did not stop anything. It may stop some showings, but other than that, it did not stop people from buying and their selling their home, because the great thing is that the interest rate went down extremely low. So that was more so motivation for them to do it. And let’s talk about things outside the market.

Alexis Sutton:

We were getting a bunch of stimulus checks. A lot of people was paying their stuff off. It was helping their credit get up, different things of that sort, that played factors into people ready to get their stuff and buy. People can work from home now. They’re saving money. It’s a lot of different things and factors that came into why not buy a home right now.

Leland Baptist:

Do you think that there’ll be any issues for, let’s say, a homeowner right now who sells their property, and then now they have to go find somewhere to live or something like that? Do you think there’ll be issues down the road for them?

Alexis Sutton:

I have a friend. We actually went to school with. He was selling his house. He was closing on his house, not my client. We don’t want to get on that. But he’s closing on his house next week. However, he couldn’t find a place that quick. So he decided to just get a lease. Some people have it contingent on … You can get this home once I find a home or once I close on my home or things of that sort.

Alexis Sutton:

So it’s kind of like, I want to say touch and go sometimes. But like I said, if you’re trying to sell your home to get top dollar, this is the thing. And most people know this. The market goes up, and it goes down. So sometimes, it’s a seller’s market and it’s a buyer. Some people will just, whatever, I’ll just rent to now and then when it becomes a buyer again and go back and buy again. But you still got that profit.

Alexis Sutton:

And for me, I think that’s smart, but I can’t tell people what to do with their funds. They do what they do. But I feel like when they sell, if they don’t have nothing lined up or maybe they’re not getting married or whatever like that, then they’re renting. They’re just renting and then just waiting for the market to change.

Alexis Sutton:

I’m not a forecast real estate meteorologist or whatever, but I do feel like it’s going to start panning out soon. And don’t take my word for it, but it’s that bad. I do think it’s going to start panning out soon, because honestly, these houses are selling way overprice. It also affects the neighbors too. Don’t nobody think about the neighbors, because y’all selling this, that, and then it’s going to raise their tax value up.

Leland Baptist:

Every time.

Alexis Sutton:

Your home’s not worth that. So it’s so many things and dynamics that come into play with just buying one home. It affects so many things. And he asked why I think they’re buying. It’s because so many other things had happened. Pandemic really worked out for a lot of people, despite what people are saying. It allowed a lot of people, definitely in our community, to get ahead or had the opportunity to get ahead, whether they took it or not, more opportunity to get their heads up.

Leland Baptist:

Yeah. Yeah. Something that I’m concerned about is whenever they open the foreclosures, I think for, let’s say, someone bought the property last month, at the height of the market, when they open up the foreclosures, there may be five people within his neighborhood or their neighborhood that goes into foreclosure, and then that’s purchased at half the value. And that could lower the value of that person’s home too, that they just bought.

Alexis Sutton:

Yeah. But with that being said, that’s just kind of how the market goes. This ain’t the first time it’s happened. It happens, when we was probably young or not. [crosstalk 00:14:38] He probably knew, but we didn’t know. But Taylor say that’s just the cycle of the real estate cycle. That’s how I look at it.

Alexis Sutton:

So right now, where buyers are, they’re scrambling. It’s going to be a time where sellers want to sell their house for dirt cheap. You know what I’m saying? Because they just want to sell it. Won’t nobody want to buy it. There’s not enough buyers out there. Okay, then this could be wrong. But when I was working in the mortgage, because I worked in mortgage, they said, “This happens every time we change Presidency, or something like that happens.”

Alexis Sutton:

Obama came in. It was a buyer’s market. There were more inventory than there is now. Everything switched. Jobs was lost and different things of that sort. So it just affects so many things, it’s like a domino effect. I mean there’s so much to even go into now. Excuse me if I’m rambling, because I know all these coming to my [inaudible 00:15:44] a few things are coming out of my mouth that are popping in my head.

Alexis Sutton:

But yeah, it’s so many dynamics that come into this market, so where people are frantic right now, on the flip side, it’s not going to be like that, I don’t want to say soon, because I’m not a guru, but it’s going to change. It just does. That’s just how it happens.

Leland Baptist:

Yeah. So what sub-markets do you think would be good for people who are looking to get into investment real estate?

Alexis Sutton:

Okay, any big city that is growing, look at them little spots on the side, because they’ll grow. Like here, it’s not too late, so for Charlotte, you have Concord. That’s grown pretty nicely. And like I talked about, Fort Mill and Rock Hill, I would really say get in Fort Mill, if you can. But they’re kind of already there now, but it would have been a good place to dig into, because they’re moving the Panthers stadium over there too.

Leland Baptist:

I didn’t know that.

Alexis Sutton:

Yeah, so Indian Land is good. They’re going up, but it’s a good place. And that’s right by Ballantyne. I don’t know if you know anything about Charlotte area, that’s kind of the affluent area, one of the affluent areas here, in Charlotte area. One thing, this is not in my market, but since I do talk to people, I do think, if people want to invest or build or something like that, I say, Greenville South Carolina. That is an area that is coming up, from what I’ve seen from other builders and contractors and stuff like that.

Alexis Sutton:

It’s like, well, I’m just going to get some land out there and hold it and stuff like that. But to figure out what’s going to be the next big thing, it’s so simple, if you’ve got common sense. Whatever city is growing, know them little places like around here, Huntersville, Gastonia.

Leland Baptist:

Gastonia.

Alexis Sutton:

[inaudible 00:17:36] Yeah, even for me, I like Belmont, but it’s growing, and that’s in between Charlotte and Gastonia, these little places you don’t know, but they’re going to be becoming these places where cash cows or whatever, maybe the wrong [termization 00:17:53] but places like that. So all these little places you don’t really hear, but you know that they’re there, I say invest there, because it’s like a virus. It spread. You know what I mean?

Leland Baptist:

Yeah. Absolutely.

Hank Hunt:

How does the single home market impact the multi-family market, and would there be opportunities to buy apartment complexes in that area?

Alexis Sutton:

Honestly, it’s not really available here. It’s not too many multi-family units here available. How it affects it? If me being honestly, I really couldn’t tell you, because I haven’t dealt with a lot of them. And on the flip side, it’s just there aren’t that many. I’ve had some people say, “Oh, I’m looking for” … One of [inaudible 00:18:51] sisters … “I’m looking for a multi-family,” because even if you don’t stay there, you can say, “Oh, I live in Apartment A. That’s in [crosstalk 00:18:58],” all in Dallas or California or something like that, just so you get that owner occupied, their loans like that. But when we looked, it was just nothing out there, because first of all, our generations are go-getters. So we already know, so we’re already going to be on it. There aren’t too many out there that I’ve seen and that are in good condition, that’s all I know about it. I wouldn’t [inaudible 00:19:27] the wrong way.

Leland Baptist:

And I’ll say to anyone who’s listening, Alexis said something that was really important. You guys might want to rewind it. Se basically mentioned the importance of looking for a multi-family. And you can still get a smaller purchase or payment, if it’s through FHA. And they allow you to live in, let’s say, a four unit, live in one unit. And then you can qualify by using other three units to buy that building.

Alexis Sutton:

Well, I’m just going to leave at that. Yeah.

Leland Baptist:

yeah, but it’s good. I’ve done it. I’ve done it myself.

Alexis Sutton:

[crosstalk 00:19:56] You can live in one unit.

Leland Baptist:

Yeah, I’ve done it, though, so that’s how I got started. But Charlotte does not have a lot of multi-family.

Alexis Sutton:

No.

Leland Baptist:

Much like the Northern part of the East Coast, there’s a lot of multi-family duplexes, triplexes, but Charlotte does not have a lot.

Alexis Sutton:

But people have in their mindset to build them. I was talking with one of my friends who’s a general contractor, and he’s like, “I’m building this multi-family unit. It’s going to be in Kannapolis.” Kannapolis is another sub out … And it’s in between Salisbury … Well, Salisbury’s kind of big. I go there a lot, because of course, I’m a veteran. It’s the VA hospital over there. But it’s not like a Charlotte. It’s not a Charlotte. But yeah, that’s the ambulance [crosstalk 00:20:42]

Leland Baptist:

It’s an apolis.

Alexis Sutton:

Yeah, it’s an apolis. You can say that.

Leland Baptist:

It’s an apolis. We live in Indianapolis, so we get it, outside of Chicago.

Alexis Sutton:

Well, yeah, you get it, so you can make it work for you. Yeah.

Leland Baptist:

So we have a question for you. Tell us your thoughts on leaving corporate America and following your dreams, pursuing your dreams.

Alexis Sutton:

[inaudible 00:21:12] don’t have no issues. I always knew that I was going to be an entrepreneur, and I wouldn’t say following your dreams. Not to nobody have to follow their dreams, but it wasn’t an oh, I’m going to follow my dreams type move. It was just me and my mentality. I don’t mind being told what to do, but you know what I’m saying? So for me, in corporate, to me, it was like modern day slavery, just to be honest with you.

Alexis Sutton:

You work really hard, and definitely as a woman, as a black woman, I worked really, really hard. And I worked in mortgage. I processed loans, in production. Here I am working hard, getting this amount of pay. And it’s a reason why HR tell you, “Do not discuss your pay.” It’s against HR to discuss your pay, because they do not want you to … letting you know the discrimination in that. And that’s just my opinion on that.

Alexis Sutton:

There was a counterpart. He was Caucasian. He came in after me, and they taught him the job, because he had no experience. However, he was getting more than me. However, I am producing more than him. So immensely, I couldn’t grasp that. And I know this world is not really fair, setup for certain people. However, I could not fathom it. So this was in 2017. Like I said, when the Presidents changed, things changed.

Alexis Sutton:

My job did layoffs, and they did layoffs in sectors, so it wouldn’t be as there’s this big company did this really big layoff or whatever, trying to be slick. But I had already had my stuff packed. I had nothing in my dresser drawer. [inaudible 00:22:53] We kind of already knew, but I already had my stuff packed. So when they was calling us like, oh, we’re going to … I think when I left, it was a group of maybe 90 of us, at the time, maybe 90 or 30 … It was a lot. Either way, it was a big that this company let go.

Alexis Sutton:

People were in there crying, and I felt bad for them, because I’m like, dang, it’s their livelihood. However, I was like, I got the rest of the day off, today, simply because being there was mentally draining. It was mentally draining, because I know when I’m great. And I didn’t want to keep building someone else’s dream that did not even value my time and my talent that I put into that.

Alexis Sutton:

So even though I was getting less money, I was much happier, because I was less stressed. Corporate is just a wild play, and then it’s the politics. And I think I just said something to a group of my friends, that I did work with, that I was cool, that I don’t be friends with people like coworkers, definitely not on social media. We had a session where they called us into a room, and they were saying, “You all are doing this right here. You’re getting these returns back.” And I’m just sitting looking like, these are people that don’t do the job. People that don’t do the job try to tell you what you’re doing wrong, but they don’t know how this process go.

Alexis Sutton:

[crosstalk 00:24:13] We was in there. They thought they was going to tell us something. And they left that meeting mad, I mean, mad, okay? And then they was like, the whole purpose of the meeting were just dismissed, because we had some smart people in there, some smart people like us in there, too. You can’t tell us about the job, we don’t know what to do. If we’re having too many touches on it, make sure that the underwriter’s sending back the right conditions, so that we don’t have to go back. We do everything you said. Oh, we need this too. Make sure they’re right, because you have to see what the turnarounds are for.

Alexis Sutton:

So when people don’t know the job and they try to tell you, people are project managers without a project manager certification. I have a degree. You’re out here with your associate’s degree, trying to tell me what to do, and you have minimum common sense. It just didn’t work for me, personally. So I left out, and I just vowed not to go back.

Hank Hunt:

During the process of your maturation, were there books that you read or people that you listened to or followed, that gave you the spark to know that you could do something different and that you would be okay?

Alexis Sutton:

I’m the spark. I mean, [crosstalk 00:25:33]

Hank Hunt:

Besides you.

Alexis Sutton:

I think, I would say, no, because everybody else’s journey is different. If you know that you want to do something … Sorry. [inaudible 00:25:45] I don’t know if y’all can hear that. Okay, sorry, someone was trying to FaceTime me.

Leland Baptist:

I thought it was Hank for a second.

Hank Hunt:

Was that our hint to cut it short?

Alexis Sutton:

Oh, no, no, no, they can wait. Anyhow, no, the reason why I say that, because I mean, we had conversations before this, and you kind of know where my mindset goes. I know my end goal, and I do understand that I cannot depend my motivation, my determination, or whether I go left or right on other people, even if they have a motivation speech. People out there, I can’t think of his name …

Leland Baptist:

Eric Thomas?

Alexis Sutton:

No.

Leland Baptist:

Tony Robbins?

Alexis Sutton:

Yeah, well, him too. He’s awesome, because he curse, and I curse a lot too. But the thing is, people will say, “Oh, you can go out there and do this. This is out there.” But you don’t know their backstory. Some people I heard that are millionaires or whatever, you think they got it just by doing movies. They don’t tell you about the back real estate that they invested in, to get where they are. So you’re thinking like, oh, if I just go be a basketball player or just go be a movie star, I’m going to get there. So they can have words that are encouragement. It’s good for the moment, like, I may have needed that push, but at the end of the day, I know where I want to be. I know where I came from, and because I am exposed and I see other great things, I know there’s stuff that are bigger than what I grew up in and what my environment.

Alexis Sutton:

So my spark is literally me, because I know what I want. I think, the guy that bought Dogecoin up, he said that what’s your motivation or whatever, if you’re looking for other people for motivation, you’re never going to get there. And it’s like your happiness. If you depend you happiness on someone else, they control your happiness. I don’t want nobody controlling my destiny of anything of that sort. So literally, I am that spark, because I didn’t want to be mentally drained. I didn’t want to be living paycheck to paycheck. And I don’t want to be living mediocre, okay?

Alexis Sutton:

I’ve been poor. I’ve been broke. I’ve been there. Cool, and I got up out of it. However, I know that there’s more, so my higher self that I see myself is my motivation.

Leland Baptist:

That’s awesome. That’s awesome.

Hank Hunt:

It is.

Leland Baptist:

For those who are listening, what would you say that you used to continue to feed that or to grow that spark?

Alexis Sutton:

It’s perception. It’s how you look at everything. And you have to have gratitude in everything, even when the things are not good. So things can happen and … Wow. So sorry.

Hank Hunt:

It’s a sale. It’s a sale.

Alexis Sutton:

I’ve got to check my FaceTime. If somebody ignores it, it’s not even safe. But back to the question … Give me a moment I’ll be trying to get my train of thought to happen. What was the question again? I apologize.

Leland Baptist:

How do you continue to feed that spark?

Alexis Sutton:

Oh, gratitude, gratitude. You have to have gratitude, I think. Bad things happen, and just growing up, a lot of bad things have happened, but I always thought to see the good in it. And it really helps my mental. So if some things happen, like when a job ended, people were sad, and that negative energy feeds off of more negative things happen. However, I looked at it as wow, I have more time to spend with my child, less gas, but mentally, I can decompress and focus on different things. I’ll be able to create, because I do have another business.

Alexis Sutton:

And although I was just doing an order here and there, eventually, I put my energy into that, and that grew. But anything, something bad happened to you, you got to look at it’s a lesson and not an ail. It’s not really a loss. And if it was something you wanted, it really wasn’t for you, and you was really denied for a reason. And honest, I feel like when the job did do layoffs, it was my push, because you know how we do. We’re get into stuff like okay, after I get this amount of money, I’m going to quit my job and blah, blah, blah. You’re too [crosstalk 00:29:58]

Alexis Sutton:

So that was more so my push, because I try not to live out of scarcity. I don’t want to live out of scarcity, saving. I got to save all this money, because I’m scared something’s going to happen. I spend it, okay? And the money comes back to me. Like I told you all before, you can get money back, but you can’t get time back. So you don’t want your years to go and you wasted it. You didn’t enjoy life.

Leland Baptist:

That’s a really good mindset to have. I don’t want to forget about this. Can you tell us, also, about your passion for art?

Alexis Sutton:

Oh, my God-given talent is creation, so I am extremely creative. I do have an art business. It’s called Kiss the Artist. Now, I’ve always can draw really good and paint really good. But my thing is I get too attached to my paintings. So I started to do [crosstalk 00:31:00]

Leland Baptist:

A true artist.

Hank Hunt:

Yeah, you’ll starve.

Leland Baptist:

A true artist.

Alexis Sutton:

I’m like, heck, no, I’m not selling that. [crosstalk 00:31:10] so you come in, there’s a whole gallery everywhere. But I did something that I could use to bless other people with, because I do know, when you see something beautiful, it changes your vibration. And if you know, I’m a spiritual person, as well, so I love art. I love to be creative. When I say my gift is to give a creation, because I do other things that are creative, not just artwork. I can do hair. I cook. I cook really well, really good. [inaudible 00:31:41] up under the table and [crosstalk 00:31:45] so like I said, my gift is to give a great … I make furniture when I’m bored. I rap. I do rings. I make jewelry. Whatever it is, I do it, because [crosstalk 00:31:57]

Hank Hunt:

Excuse me, who are you?

Alexis Sutton:

I told you, I am-

Leland Baptist:

She’s Picasso reembodied.

Hank Hunt:

No, no, she’s the Energizer bunny. She’s multi-talented.

Alexis Sutton:

I’m multi-dimensional.

Hank Hunt:

And earlier, I asked the question about who have you read that sort of gave you the impetus to do what you’re doing, but you’re being so philosophical, pragmatic, practical … Why you laughing?

Alexis Sutton:

No, I got you. No, you told me this earlier about me, asking who are you? [crosstalk 00:32:31] I don’t know the conversation [crosstalk 00:32:33]

Hank Hunt:

But it’s the idea that, again, you just seem to be far wiser than your years, so if there isn’t someone or something, someone that you’re talking to, to give you guidance or something that you’ve read to give you guidance, then all of this is being marinated in self. I’m just sitting here, basically, blown away by the passion, the energy, the determination, the success. How do you wrap all that into your day, with a child?

Alexis Sutton:

One word you said is self. I literally know self. And it took me having to sit down, be still, be in solitude, understand me. Now, whatever people’s beliefs are, but this is mine. We all come here equipped with certain tools and preferably from a past life. However, I feel like I came here with the correct tools to navigate the Buddhist world. And yes, I have a child. And for her, if you have a conversation with my child, I’ve never heard different, even when she was young. Well, she’s six now. But at four, she’s having conversations. They’d be like, “She speaks so intelligent.” I’m like, when the little girl told me she was baffled the other day, I’m just like, first of all, I didn’t learn this world until I got to be an adult.

Alexis Sutton:

But I do know that I am her first person, her role model. And the fact that I got the opportunity to guide her through this world, at least to give her a foundation, is a job that I really take seriously. I love being a mom. I want more kids. I love being a mom, but to know that I am grooming a future goddess, a future leader, that means a lot to me. What’s worth what you know if you don’t teach it to other people, better yet, the younger generations that are going to carry y’all over when we can’t do it? Yeah, the spark, it really comes from within.

Hank Hunt:

Okay. Again, that’s amazing, only because there’s so many people who have talent, who have energy, who have coaches and mentors, and they’re still in neutral. And some of them are so afraid of taking the chance on themselves, that they never really get out the front door, figuratively.

Alexis Sutton:

But that’s scarcity and the fear. People, they feel failure, but like people always say … You can find this on a quote on Instagram … Failure is a part of success.

Hank Hunt:

Do you think some people fear success?

Alexis Sutton:

Yes.

Hank Hunt:

Okay. Okay.

Alexis Sutton:

I do, simply because I had moments where I feared it. I know what type of person I am. If I got an order, I got to hurry up and do it. I put the pressure on myself. Other people don’t do it, so since I know I put pressure on myself, I fear that mental breakdown. It’s different dynamics of it. People do want to be successful. Sometimes, they don’t want to do the work. And I get it, because it’s not easy, but who says it’s hard either? It’s not really that hard, once you do it and go through the ranks. People fear things they don’t know. It’s just something simple like people don’t know how to start and LLC. And they’re like, “Well, I don’t know how to do it” and pay people all this money to do it. And here in North Carolina, it costs you $125 and it takes you 15 minutes. So all this builds up [crosstalk 00:36:37]

Hank Hunt:

True that.

Alexis Sutton:

… in your mind before you even get started. That’s where you get defeated. It’s mental. So if I didn’t get my mental right and had to be in self and know who I am, that’s just with people that come in my life, too. I tell people, “You have to treat me a certain way.” I’m not being boujee or nothing like that. But I know how I move. I know I’m going to treat you with respect too. I’m open, honest. I feel it’s important to communicate. I don’t want to leave nobody out here assuming, because when you’re assuming, you make a you know what out of yourself. So I do feel like it’s important that when I have people come in my space, to know what I require, as a human being. And then to know what you require, most time, people don’t know what they require.

Leland Baptist:

They don’t know. They don’t them self either.

Alexis Sutton:

[crosstalk 00:37:29] a companionship. They want a boo.

Leland Baptist:

There you go.

Hank Hunt:

Do you find that oftentimes people are focusing on the cost of something rather than the … the initial cost versus the outcome or the reward on the other end?

Alexis Sutton:

Yes.

Hank Hunt:

They see the cost as a hurdle and about, well, I can’t afford that. I’m not willing to do X,Y,Z, which says that you are then comfortable in your discomfort. You are ordinary without realizing that you’re just ordinary.

Alexis Sutton:

Like my grandma always say, it’s plenty of ways to skin a cat. So I you don’t have the money now, work on the things that don’t really require the money and to build up to that. The reason why I say that, because I had a conversation with another lady about another project that I’m working on with [inaudible 00:38:26] business and getting things out there in stores. And she was talking to me, and she was kind of treading lightly. She said, “I’m just go and ahead and let you know, something happened. They were like, oh, you need $10,000.” It’s kind of like, you got to be ready. I’m just sitting here looking like, she done and do this two or three times. I’m like, “Ma’am, with all due respect, if I need the money, if I got $2 in my account, I already prayed, and I have people surrounded by me, that if I need money, that money’s there,” because I have people around me that do believe in me.

Alexis Sutton:

So if I call my friend, like “I need $15,000 for this right here,” got you, because I did pray for people like that. I don’t want to be around broke mindset people. I’m not talking about broke people, but if your mindset is broke, then that’s your outcome going to be, pretty much. But I had to say, “I feel different about money now.” Money loves me. It comes to me. That’s what I say.

Alexis Sutton:

And when I need it, it’s going to come, someway, somehow, and I just believe that. That’s just my beliefs, and people can say, “Oh, that’s really not you.” It’s whatever. However, look at me. I’m good right [crosstalk 00:39:33]

Leland Baptist:

Reverend Ike, I dig it.

Alexis Sutton:

Right. [crosstalk 00:39:38] There we go.

Leland Baptist:

Yeah. Alexis, before we wrap up, what’s the one thing you want people who are listening or watching this to take home?

Alexis Sutton:

Don’t perform to anyone’s limited beliefs. You can literally do what you want to do. I’m not just saying it to be, like I say, a meme or something like that, but literally, people will put their limited beliefs on you, so that you can believe them. Watch your surroundings. Like I said, if you’re the smartest person in the room, you are in the wrong room, because you can only go as high as yourself. And I mean, I like to be a student. I like to have friends and people that are in business that they know more than me, because they’re going to carry you.

Alexis Sutton:

Most people that are older, not elder elders, but are older people, they want to pull you up, because they see oh, I see this young lady. She’s 31. She’s doing this. Let me help her out. Let me invest in her. And then it’s going to be our job within, to pull these other people up as well. And it’s not a grabbing a bucket, barrel. It’s literally helping people out. But most importantly y’all, do not put nobody’s limited beliefs on you. People say you can’t do it. That’s okay. Like I tell you, I don’t announce the move until I’m saying checkmate, because I don’t need nobody’s negative energy on what I’m trying to do. So if it’s something you want to do, your momma, your daddy, your cousin saying, “Oh, you can’t do it. You just land third.” Trust me, it’s plenty of that examples out there that shows you I could.

Leland Baptist:

Awesome.

Hank Hunt:

[crosstalk 00:41:18] perspective.

Leland Baptist:

Awesome. awesome. Wow, powerful. On that note, I think that’s a wrap. All the links for Alexis and her businesses will be in the descriptions. So please check that out as well, and until next time.

Alexis Sutton:

Appreciate y’all.

Hank Hunt:

Thank you, ma’am. It’s a pleasure.

Alexis Sutton:

All right. Bye, bye.

Hank Hunt:

Bye.

Connect with Alexis Sutton

Website: http://luxuriesofcharlotte.com/

Call or Text: (980) 333-7119

https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexis-vinique-67177148/

Share this post on:
Avatar MediaTeam

Author: MediaTeam

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *